Ginger Baker: Middle Passage, Tape
Ginger Baker: Middle Passage, Tape
€8.90
Net price (incl. 19% VAT)

Ginger Baker
Middle Passage

  • Compact Cassette
  • United States
cut-out
  • Axiom
  • (539 864-4)
  • 6 Tracks
  • UPC 016253986442
  • M / EX-
  • virgin
  • sealed

tracks

A1

Mektoub

Written By
7:05
A2

Under Black Skies

Written By
6:59
A3

Time Be Time

Written By
5:00
B1

Alamout

Written By
5:48
B2

Basil

5:21
B3

South To The Dust

Written By
5:00

Credits

Bass
  • Bill Laswell
  • Jah Wobble
Drums
  • Ginger Baker
Engineer
  • Anne Pope
  • Martin Bisi
  • Oz Fritz
  • Paul Berry
  • Robert Musso
Guitar
  • Nicky Skopelitis
Sitar
  • Nicky Skopelitis
Banjo
  • Nicky Skopelitis
Synthesizer
  • Nicky Skopelitis
Mastered By
  • Howie Weinberg
Mixed By
  • Jason Corsaro
Ney
  • Omar Faruk Tekbilek
Flute
  • Omar Faruk Tekbilek
Organ
  • Bernie Worrell
Percussion
  • Aiyb Dieng
  • Magette Fall
  • Mar Gueye
Producer
  • Bill Laswell
Written By

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6×LP (Vinyl)
“To succeed in life is to believe in this moment when all is magic, when you’re a giant; to succeed in life is to cross an ocean, not knowing what for nor whom for, to be off on an adventure, quite simply” Bernard Tapie The French in the 80s were not faint-hearted: as some threw themselves heart and soul into music or business, others wouldn’t mind going bottomless to get themselves noticed… While Bernard Tapie soon realized his own fortune was rather to be found in business, many music-loving dreamers already imagined themselves in the sun, in an enchanting world made of funky rhythms and synthesizers. While the French National Front was growing in the shadow of François Mitterrand, these guys mixed New York-style funk with electronic, Eastern or African sounds. These musicians from all backgrounds – often lovers of “gentle pranking” as introduced by the newly-licensed independent radio stations – were seeking the easy money they were told about so much. With their genre-crossing arrangements and often chanted lyrics, they brought honor to the “SOS Racisme” generation, unconsciously outlining the nascent French contemporary urban culture. It must be said, the time was conducive to all kinds of mixes: following the left’s accession to power, many illegal immigrants had just been sorted out, and Southern cultures were in vogue in all fields.