Marlena Shaw: The Spice Of Life, LP (Vinyl)
Marlena Shaw: The Spice Of Life, LP (Vinyl)
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Marlena Shaw
The Spice Of Life

  • LP (Vinyl)
  • United States
  • Cadet
  • (LPS 833)
  • 10 Tracks
  • no barcode
  • heavy item (300g)
  • M / M
  • virgin
  • sealed

tracks

A1

Woman Of The Ghetto

Written By
6:02
A2

Call It Stormy Monday

Written By
3:01
A3

Where Can I Go

Written By
2:21
A4

I'm Satisfied

Written By
2:48
A5

I Wish I Knew (How It Would Feel To Be Free)

Written By
3:12
B1

Liberation Conversation

Written By
2:03
B2

California Soul

Written By
2:59
B3

Go Away Little Boy

Written By
2:45
B4

Looking Thru The Eyes Of Love

Written By
3:00
B5

Anyone Can Move A Mountain

Written By
3:03

Credits

Arranged By
  • Charles Stepney
  • Richard Evans
Producer
  • Charles Stepney
  • Richard Evans
Design
  • Jerry Griffith
Engineer
  • Dave Purple
  • Stu Black
Liner Notes
  • Loonis McGlohon
Other
  • Bobby Miller
Photography
  • Bob Crawford

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6×LP (Vinyl)
“To succeed in life is to believe in this moment when all is magic, when you’re a giant; to succeed in life is to cross an ocean, not knowing what for nor whom for, to be off on an adventure, quite simply” Bernard Tapie The French in the 80s were not faint-hearted: as some threw themselves heart and soul into music or business, others wouldn’t mind going bottomless to get themselves noticed… While Bernard Tapie soon realized his own fortune was rather to be found in business, many music-loving dreamers already imagined themselves in the sun, in an enchanting world made of funky rhythms and synthesizers. While the French National Front was growing in the shadow of François Mitterrand, these guys mixed New York-style funk with electronic, Eastern or African sounds. These musicians from all backgrounds – often lovers of “gentle pranking” as introduced by the newly-licensed independent radio stations – were seeking the easy money they were told about so much. With their genre-crossing arrangements and often chanted lyrics, they brought honor to the “SOS Racisme” generation, unconsciously outlining the nascent French contemporary urban culture. It must be said, the time was conducive to all kinds of mixes: following the left’s accession to power, many illegal immigrants had just been sorted out, and Southern cultures were in vogue in all fields.