Gil Evans: Gil Evans & Ten, Tape
Gil Evans: Gil Evans & Ten, Tape
€11.90
Net price (incl. 19% VAT) excl. shipping costs
Gil Evans
Gil Evans & Ten
  • Compact Cassette
  • United States
  • Original Jazz Classics
  • (OJC-5346)
  • Prestige
  • (PRESTIGE-7120)
  • 7 Tracks
  • UPC 025218534642
  • M- / M-
  • virgin
  • sealed

tracks

A1

Remember

A2

Ella Speed

A3

Big Stuff

B1

Nobody's Heart

B2

Just One Of Those Things

B3

If You Could See Me Now

B4

Jambangle

Credits

Alto saxophone
  • Zeke Tolin
Bass
  • Paul Chambers
Bass trombone
  • Bart Varsalona
Bassoon
  • Dave Kurtzer
Drums
  • Jo Jones
  • Nick Stabulas
French horn
  • Willie Ruff
Liner notes
  • Ira Gitler
Piano
  • Gil Evans
Recorded by
  • Rudy Van Gelder
Soprano saxophone
  • Steve Lacy
Supervised by
  • Bob Weinstock
Trombone
  • Jimmy Cleveland
Trumpet
  • John Carisi
  • Louis R. Mucci
  • Jake Koven

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2×LP (Vinyl)
1968. France, Incorporated. The entire building was being consumed by flames and was slowly collapsing. Nothing would survive. Out of the rubble of the old world jumped the children of Marx and Coca-Cola, ripping the white and blue stripes off the French flag. Yet, the socialist revolution was more mythic than real and music did nothing to mitigate people's behavior. It was time for innovation. While singles from the Stones, Who, Kinks and MC5 provided an incendiary soundtrack for the revolution, it was Black Americans who truly blew the world from its foundations in the 60s. Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor, Eric Dolphy, Albert Ayler and Archie Shepp left behind the jazz of their fathers' generation, liberating the notes, trashing the structures, diving headfirst into furious improvisations, inventing a new land without boundaries – neither spiritual nor political. Free jazz endowed the saxophone with the power to destroy the established order. In 1969, the Art Ensemble of Chicago arrived at the Théâtre du Vieux Colombier in Paris and a new fuse was lit. Their multi-instrumentalism made use of a varied multiplicity of "little instruments" (including bicycle bells, wind chimes, steel drums, vibraphone and djembe: they left no stone unturned), which they employed according to their inspirations.