Flamingo: This Is Our Soul, LP (Vinyl)
Flamingo: This Is Our Soul, LP (Vinyl)
€8.90
Net price (not subject to VAT §25a UStG) excl. shipping costs
Flamingo
Marie Rottrová
Petr Němec
This Is Our Soul
  • LP (Vinyl)
  • Czechoslovakia
1971 Czech Soul-Jazz album, orange labels, glossy sleeve
  • Supraphon
  • (1 13 1024)
  • 11 Tracks
  • no barcode
  • EX / EX
  • used

tracks

A1

Big Chain

Lead vocals
  • Marie Rottrová
Written by
2:35
A2

The Weight

Lead vocals
  • Marie Rottrová
Written by
2:55
A3

Hey Lonely Girl

Lead vocals
  • Petr Němec
Lyrics by
Music by
2:25
A4

Ain't No Way

Lead vocals
  • Marie Rottrová
Written by
3:30
A5

Sunny

Organ
  • Vladimír Figar
Written by
6:50
B1

Chain Of Fools

Lead vocals
  • Marie Rottrová
Written by
2:45
B2

I've Got Dreams To Remember

Lead vocals
  • Petr Němec
Written by
3:40
B3

Oh! What A Fool I've Been

Lead vocals
  • Marie Rottrová
Written by
2:15
B4

Nothing's Too Good For My Baby

Lead vocals
  • Petr Němec
Written by
2:15
B5

Purple Angels

Lead vocals
  • Marie Rottrová
Lyrics by
Music by
3:20
B6

Quasimodo's Dream

Organ
  • Vladimír Figar
Written by
7:10

Credits

Bass guitar
  • Jiří Urbánek
Design
  • Stanislav Holeček
Drums
  • Radek Dominik
Engineer
  • František Řebíček
  • Jiří Rohan
  • Milan Svoboda
Guitar
  • Jan Hasník
Organ
  • Vladimír Figar
Piano
  • Vladimír Figar
Photography by
  • Alexandr Janovský
Producer
  • Jaromír Tůma
Recording supervisor
  • Jan Spálený
  • Mojmír Balling
  • Vladimír Popelka
Sleeve notes
  • Jiří Černý
Tenor saxophone
  • Rudolf Březina
Trumpet
  • Richard Kovalčík
Leader
  • Richard Kovalčík
Vocals
  • Marie Rottrová
  • Petr Němec

Related

Various: Mobilisation Générale
€23.90
Various
Mobilisation Générale
Brigitte Fontaine
The Art Ensemble Of Chicago
François Tusques
Alfred Panou
Areski Belkacem
und 11 weitere ...
2×LP (Vinyl)
1968. France, Incorporated. The entire building was being consumed by flames and was slowly collapsing. Nothing would survive. Out of the rubble of the old world jumped the children of Marx and Coca-Cola, ripping the white and blue stripes off the French flag. Yet, the socialist revolution was more mythic than real and music did nothing to mitigate people's behavior. It was time for innovation. While singles from the Stones, Who, Kinks and MC5 provided an incendiary soundtrack for the revolution, it was Black Americans who truly blew the world from its foundations in the 60s. Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor, Eric Dolphy, Albert Ayler and Archie Shepp left behind the jazz of their fathers' generation, liberating the notes, trashing the structures, diving headfirst into furious improvisations, inventing a new land without boundaries – neither spiritual nor political. Free jazz endowed the saxophone with the power to destroy the established order. In 1969, the Art Ensemble of Chicago arrived at the Théâtre du Vieux Colombier in Paris and a new fuse was lit. Their multi-instrumentalism made use of a varied multiplicity of "little instruments" (including bicycle bells, wind chimes, steel drums, vibraphone and djembe: they left no stone unturned), which they employed according to their inspirations.