The J.B.'s: Hustle With Speed, LP (Vinyl)
The J.B.'s: Hustle With Speed, LP (Vinyl)
€24.90
Net price (incl. 19% VAT)

The J.B.'s
Hustle With Speed

  • LP (Vinyl)
  • United States
Neuauflage
  • Get On Down
  • (GET 54075-LP)
  • Universal Music Special Markets
  • (B0021831-01)
  • 7 Tracks
  • UPC 664425407518
  • M / M
  • virgin

tracks

A1

(It's Not The Express) It's The J.B.'s Monaurail

8:18
A2

Here We Come, Here We Go, Here We Are

4:29
A3

All Aboard The Soul Funky Train

4:33
A4

Transmograpfication

4:04
B1

Thank You For Letting Me Be Myself And You Be Yours

9:46
B2

Taurus, Aries & Leo

6:36
B3

Things & Do

5:17

Credits

Arranged By
  • James Brown
Leader
  • James Brown
Art Direction
  • Bill Levy
Cover
  • Fred Marcellino
Artwork
  • Fred Marcellino
Engineer
  • David Stone
  • Major Little
  • Neil Schwartz
  • Bob Both
Supervised By
  • Bob Both
Producer
  • Charles Bobbit
  • Don Love
Written By

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