Max Romeo: A Dream, LP (Vinyl)
Max Romeo: A Dream, LP (Vinyl)
€17.90
Net price (incl. 19% VAT)

Max Romeo : A Dream

  • LP (Vinyl)
  • Italy
Neuauflage
  • Radiation Roots
  • (RROO330)
  • 11 Tracks
  • EAN 8592735007925
  • M / M
  • virgin

tracks

A1

Wet Dream (Electronically Rebalanced)

A2

A No Fe Me Piccn'y

A3

Far Far Away

A4

The Horn

A5

Hear My Plea

A6

Love

B1

I Don't Want To Lose Your Love

B2

Wood Under Cellar

B3

Wine Her Goosie

B4

Club Raid

B5

You Can't Stop Me

Credits

Arranged By
  • Derrick Morgan
  • Ranford "Rannie Bop" Williams
Backing Band
  • The Rudies
Cover
  • Carl Palmer
  • Jeff Palmer
Engineer
  • Tony Pike
Lead Guitar
  • Errol Daniels
Liner Notes
  • Ornette Denardo
Producer
  • Bunny Lee
  • Derrick Morgan
  • Harry Dee

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