Various: Paramount Hot Jazz Rarities 1926-1928, LP (Vinyl)
Various: Paramount Hot Jazz Rarities 1926-1928, LP (Vinyl)
€7.90
Net price (not subject to VAT §25a UStG) excl. shipping costs
Various
Paramount Hot Jazz Rarities 1926-1928
Blythe's Sinful Five
Viola Bartlette
Austin And His Musical Ambassadors
The Hotentots
Elzadie Robinson
und 5 weitere ...
  • LP (Vinyl)
  • United States
  • Herwin Records
  • (Herwin 110)
  • 14 Tracks
  • no barcode
  • EX- / EX-
  • used

tracks

A1

Blythe's Sinful Five
Plump Tillie

Alto saxophone
  • E. Cobb
Banjo
  • Unknown Artist
Cornet
  • Bob Shoffner
Drums
  • W.E. Burton
Kazoo
  • W.E. Burton
Piano
  • Jimmy Blythe
Violin
  • Leroy Pickett
A2

Viola Bartlette
Blythe's Sinful Five
Anna Mina Forty And St. Louis Shorty

Alto saxophone
  • E. Cobb
Cornet
  • Bernie Young
Drums
  • W.E. Burton
Piano
  • Jimmy Blythe
Violin
  • Leroy Pickett
Vocals
  • Viola Bartlette
A3

Viola Bartlette
Blythe's Sinful Five
Quit Knocking On My Door

Alto saxophone
  • E. Cobb
Cornet
  • Bernie Young
Drums
  • W.E. Burton
Piano
  • Jimmy Blythe
Violin
  • Leroy Pickett
Vocals
  • Viola Bartlette
A4

Austin And His Musical Ambassadors
Don't Forget To Mess Around When You Do The Charleston Take 1

Bass
  • Unknown Artist
Clarinet
  • Vance Dixon
Alto saxophone
  • Vance Dixon
Cornet
  • Bob Shoffner
  • Shirley Clay
Drums
  • Unknown Artist
Piano
  • Tiny Parham
Tenor saxophone
  • Unknown Artist
A5

Austin And His Musical Ambassadors
Don't Forget To Mess Around When You Do The Charleston Take 2

Bass
  • Unknown Artist
Clarinet
  • Vance Dixon
Alto saxophone
  • Vance Dixon
Cornet
  • Bob Shoffner
  • Shirley Clay
Drums
  • Unknown Artist
Piano
  • Tiny Parham
Tenor saxophone
  • Unknown Artist
A6

The Hotentots
Lots O'Mama

Banjo
  • Unknown Artist
Clarinet
  • Vance Dixon
Cornet
  • Freddie Keppard
Drums
  • Unknown Artist
Piano
  • Unknown Artist
Trombone
  • Unknown Artist
A7

Elzadie Robinson
Preston Jackson's Uptown Band
Houston Bound

Banjo
  • Johnny St. Cyr
Clarinet
  • Artie Sarks
Cornet
  • Shirley Clay
Piano
  • R.M. Jones
Trombone
  • Preston Jackson
B1

Wilson's T.O.B.A. Band
Steady Roll

Alto saxophone
  • Sidney Costello
Cornet
  • Andrew Webb
Drums
  • Beverly Sexton
Piano
  • Jane Hemingway
Vocals
  • Willie Lewis
B2

Wilson's T.O.B.A. Band
Backyard Blues

Alto saxophone
  • Sidney Costello
Cornet
  • Andrew Webb
Drums
  • Beverly Sexton
Piano
  • Jane Hemingway
Vocals
  • Willie Lewis
B3

Jeanette's Synco Jazzers
The Bumps

Alto saxophone
  • John Williams
Banjo
  • Joe Williams
Drums
  • Robert Prince
Piano
  • Mary Lou Williams
Trombone
  • Bradley Bullett
Trumpet
  • Henry McCord
B4

Jeanette's Synco Jazzers
What's That Thing

Alto saxophone
  • John Williams
Banjo
  • Joe Williams
Drums
  • Robert Prince
Piano
  • Mary Lou Williams
Trombone
  • Bradley Bullett
Trumpet
  • Henry McCord
B5

D.C. Nelson's Serenaders
New Orleans Breakdown

Clarinet
  • Vance Dixon
Alto saxophone
  • Vance Dixon
Cornet
  • Dave Nelson
Piano
  • J. Norman Ebron
Trombone
  • Albert Wynn
B6

D.C. Nelson's Serenaders
Coo Coo Stomp

Clarinet
  • Vance Dixon
Alto saxophone
  • Vance Dixon
Cornet
  • Dave Nelson
Piano
  • J. Norman Ebron
Trombone
  • Albert Wynn
B7

Beverly Syncopators
Sugar

Alto saxophone
  • Unknown Artist
Cornet
  • Unknown Artist
Guitar
  • Unknown Artist
Trumpet
  • Unknown Artist

Credits

Cover
  • Nova Graphics, Inc.
Liner notes
  • Stephen Lavine
Mastered by
  • Jerry Valburn
Producer
  • Bernard Klatzko

Related

Various: Mobilisation Générale
€23.90
Various
Mobilisation Générale
Brigitte Fontaine
The Art Ensemble Of Chicago
François Tusques
Alfred Panou
Areski Belkacem
und 11 weitere ...
2×LP (Vinyl)
1968. France, Incorporated. The entire building was being consumed by flames and was slowly collapsing. Nothing would survive. Out of the rubble of the old world jumped the children of Marx and Coca-Cola, ripping the white and blue stripes off the French flag. Yet, the socialist revolution was more mythic than real and music did nothing to mitigate people's behavior. It was time for innovation. While singles from the Stones, Who, Kinks and MC5 provided an incendiary soundtrack for the revolution, it was Black Americans who truly blew the world from its foundations in the 60s. Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor, Eric Dolphy, Albert Ayler and Archie Shepp left behind the jazz of their fathers' generation, liberating the notes, trashing the structures, diving headfirst into furious improvisations, inventing a new land without boundaries – neither spiritual nor political. Free jazz endowed the saxophone with the power to destroy the established order. In 1969, the Art Ensemble of Chicago arrived at the Théâtre du Vieux Colombier in Paris and a new fuse was lit. Their multi-instrumentalism made use of a varied multiplicity of "little instruments" (including bicycle bells, wind chimes, steel drums, vibraphone and djembe: they left no stone unturned), which they employed according to their inspirations.